exhibition view
Come Helga, This Is No Place For Us II
Maureen Paley, London
2011

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Maureen Paley is pleased to present Rebecca Warren’s third solo exhibition at the gallery.

exhibition view
Come Helga, This Is No Place For Us II
Maureen Paley, London
2011

The Dane

hand-painted bronze
290 x 52 x 50 cm
edition of 3 + 1 AP
2011

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exhibition view
Come Helga, This Is No Place For Us
Maureen Paley, London
2011

There Is Another Way

hand-painted bronze
299.7 x 71.1 x 68.6 cm
edition of 3 + 1 AP
2011

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Warren’s sculptures ebb from figuration to abstraction, ranging from the amorphous to more clearly recognizable forms. Always evident in Warren’s work is the negotiation between thought and process. Ideas (about authorship and authenticity) and influences (literary, psychological and pop cultural) are filtered, distorted and often discarded as they find three-dimensional form.

National Geographic
reinforced clay on painted MDF plinth
clay: 40 x 40 x 40 cm
plinth: 107 x 46.5 x 36 cm
2011

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Mélancholie
steel and pompom
59.5 x 51.8 x 28 cm
edition of 2 + 1 AP
2011



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Her sculptures can be tender and droll, yet also aggressive in their depiction of the female form. She often manages to both invoke and skewer the work of familiar male artists such as Willem de Kooning, Lucio Fontana, Alberto Giacometti and cartoonist R. Crumb, however individually and collectively Warren’s works form an entirely modern, complex and distinctive visual language.

The Potter
reinforced clay on painted MDF plinth
clay: 70 x 70 x 90 cm
plinth: 96 x 46 x 45 cm
2010

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The Irregulars
steel
part 1: 199 x 4.5 x 4.5 cm
part 2: 202.5 x 8 x 3.5 cm
edition of 2 + 1 AP
2011

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Rebecca Warren was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2006. In 2009 a major exhibition of her work was held at the Serpentine Gallery, London (cat.) and in 2011 she was selected to participate in the 54th Venice Biennale. She has had concurrent solo shows at The Renaissance Society at The University of Chicago and The Art Institute of Chicago, 2010. Her work was included in the Tate Triennial, Tate Britain, London, 2006 and in 2004 a solo exhibition, Dark Passage, was held at the Kunsthalle Zurich, Zurich (cat.). Warren’s work has also appeared in exhibitions at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, Barbican Art Gallery, London, Palais de Tokyo, Paris and the New Museum, New York. In 2008 she was nominated for The Vincent Award. Rebecca Warren lives and works in London.